Do you have the UK's most popular car colour?

Grey has overtaken black as the UK’s most popular new car colour for the first time ever.

More than 495,000 new grey cars were chosen in 2018, according to the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT).

With 21% of the market share, grey claimed the top spot for the first time since records began in 1996.

Black came in second with 20%, followed by white at 18%, blue with 16% and red at 10%.

Once the nation’s long-standing favourite, silver fell out of the top five, with its lowest popularity rating since the late 1990s.

Image: Beige saw a 28% increase

British motorists shunned primary colours, with red, blue or yellow last making it into the top three nine years ago.

New car sales declined overall by 7% in 2018, with the industry blaming a number of issues.

It was not all the usual colours winning though, with orange and beige cars bucking the trend, with an increase of 37% and 28% to claim seventh and 10th place respectively.

Beige made its first top 10 appearance since 2014, as a number of new and upgraded models had the colour as an option.

Yellow and cream plunged by 34% while orange soared by 37%.

Image: Yellow and cream plunged by 34% while orange soared by 37%.

Cream and yellow cars were the biggest losers, both falling by 34%.

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Mike Hawes, the SMMT’s chief executive, said: “There are more opportunities than ever to personalise your new car to your exact taste, and UK motorists have approached the challenge with gusto in 2018.

“With around 80 new or upgraded models coming to market in 2019 equipped with the latest low and zero-emission powertrains, advanced safety tech and exciting comfort and convenience features, it’s great that buyers have so much to choose from.”

Parents' desperate 'final call' to get new heart for baby Carter

The parents of a three-week-old baby say he has just hours left to live unless he gets a new heart.

Carter, who was born prematurely on Boxing Day, is being kept alive at Newcastle’s Freeman Hospital by an Ecmo (extracorporeal membrane oxygenation) machine, which is pumping blood around his body.

Sarah and Chris Cookson lost their firstborn son, Charlie, when he was just two years old from an undiagnosed condition.

Their newborn baby, who they describe as their “miracle baby”, survived three cardiac arrests within hours of being born but doctors became concerned after realising Carter’s heart was damaged on one side.

He was operated on, to attach a pacemaker, but the surgery was unsuccessful.

His parents have been told the Ecmo machine cannot be used indefinitely as there are complications with the machine, which means Carter needs a heart transplant within days.

Mr Cookson, 40, told Sky News: “We have got hours… maybe one day, two days… We don’t have long left and our fear of not taking our son home is becoming a reality now.

“Knowing that when you see him that’s your boy who is sitting there.

“There’s nothing you can do as parents: we can’t fix him, we can’t go out and buy a heart, we can’t do medical procedure. We can’t.”

Image: Carter is hooked up to an Ecmo machine at The Freeman Hospital in Newcastle. Pic: Google Streetview

Mrs Cookson, 43, added: “We’ve done everything we can, along with the massive support network that we have got, we haven’t failed him. I think that’s what we’ve got to keep.

“We are praying to God something comes within a very short space of time.”

The couple set up the Charlie Cookson Foundation in 2013, after their firstborn died, to help provide financial aid to the families of seriously ill children.

Joanne Nicholson, a family friend who helps run the charity, described the appeal for a donor as just needing “the right person to hear it”.

“It is heartbreaking to think that a family have to go through something devastating for us to get what we want”, she said

“It’s a double-edged sword. It’s awful to think but we are just praying that a family might get something out of giving Carter a gift of life.”

Carter’s parents describe their appeal for a donor heart as “a final call”.

Mr Cookson said: “I’m 40 years old and Sarah is 43 – it was the last time we were going to have a chance to try for kids but we tried again.

“We thought nobody can be unlucky twice and then here we are – we have got a son who is 19 days old and we could be 24 to 48 hours away from losing him again.

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“We may have to bury our second child.

“No parent should have to go through the first time, never mind the second time, but if we don’t get a heart donation we are going to have to do that.”

Johnson: Use Brexit to unite the country

Boris Johnson claims now is the time to “use Brexit to unite the country”, in a major speech which will be seen as the latest move in his Tory leadership campaign.

In a “wide-ranging speech”, a label widely seen by MPs as code for a leadership bid, Mr Johnson will urge the government to focus on the “issues that drove Brexit”.

Coming only days after Theresa May suffered a humiliating Commons defeat by a record 230 votes on her Brexit deal, the speech will be seen as a further act of disloyalty.

The venue, the headquarters of the JCB empire headed by billionaire Tory donor and Leave backer Anthony Bamford, will also be seen as an attempt by Mr Johnson to look prime ministerial.

The JCB excavator plant, at Rocester in Staffordshire, was also the venue for a major speech by David Cameron on Europe and immigration policy in 2014 when he was prime minister.

Although Mr Johnson spoke in the five-day Brexit debate in the Commons on Monday, the JCB speech is his first major leadership pitch since his “Chuck Chequers” rally at the Tory conference in October.

In his speech, Mr Johnson – who quit as foreign secretary in July in protest at Mrs May’s deal – said the government should “use this moment to become more productive and more dynamic”.

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Video: ‘Cheese and onion crisps’ will survive Brexit

He will say: “Yes [Brexit] was about democracy… but that vote, was also triggered by a feeling that in some way the people of this country has been drifting too far apart and in areas where we need to come together.

“We all know about boardroom pay and the huge expansion in the last 25 years of the gap between the remuneration of FTSE 100 CEOs and the average workers in their firms.

“We know one of the ways big corporations have held wages down is that they have had access to unlimited pools of labour from other countries.”

Boris Johnson speaks at the Conservative Home fringe meeting at the Conservative Party Conference 3:00

Video: ‘Chuck Chequers’: Johnson speech highlights

On immigration, Mr Johnson will say: “Now I am a free market capitalist and a passionate believer in the benefits of migration.

“But there must be a balance and if an influx of labour is being used not only to prevent investment in capital equipment but also in the skills and prospects of young people then we need to think carefully about how we control immigration.

“Because if we want the people of Britain to have a pay rise, as I do, then we can’t expect to do it by simply controlling immigration, we have to address all the causes of the productivity gap that has so massively expanded.

preview image 11:48

Video: Johnson’s resignation speech in full

“I don’t mean the gap between the UK, France Germany and Italy, though we are behind our main competitors the most worrying gap is between London, the most productive part of the whole European economy and other regions in the UK.

“If you look at the distribution of the Brexit vote, it is clear that people felt that gap in attainments and prospects and that they wanted something done.

“If we are to bring our nation together that means investing in great public services and safer streets, better hospitals, better transport links and better housing.”

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In his speech, Mr Johnson will also call for more devolution of powers to the English regions and a halt on income tax increases, a call he issued at his rally at the Conservative Party Conference in Birmingham.

“We must… create the most favourable tax environment with no new taxes and no increases in rates and no one rich or poor to pay more than 50% of their income in tax,” he will say.

“Not because we want to create a tax haven for the rich but because that it is the way to stimulate the income we need to pay for this national programme of cohesion.”

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And he will add: “We should take… council tax, business rates, stamp duty, land tax and the annual tax on enveloped dwellings, bundling them together giving them to local mayors and politicians to spend so that they have clear incentives to go for growth as northern powerhouse minister Jake Berry suggested last week.”

Mr Berry, MP for Rossendale and Darwen, is one of Mr Johnson’s closest allies in the Commons and was a key member of his team during his leadership bid in 2016, which he abruptly halted at his campaign launch, to the dismay of his supporters.

Obama praised Duke's smooth driving, but is he too old to drive at 97?

When the Obamas visited the UK for a state visit in 2016, they weren’t escorted from their helicopter by a security driver.

Instead, the task fell to Prince Philip – a keen motorist. The Duke of Edinburgh, 94 at the time, gave the Queen and the world’s most powerful couple a lift to Windsor Castle.

Mr Obama was complimentary about the duke’s driving skills, and said at the time: “I have to say I have never been driven by a Duke of Edinburgh before and I can report that it was very smooth riding.”

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Video: 2016: Duke drives Obamas to lunch

But three years on, questions are now being raised as to whether Prince Philip should still be driving at the age of 97 after he was involved in a car crash while behind the wheel near the Sandringham Estate.

Royal biographer Penny Junor told Sky News: “It was a horrible thing to happen, but should he be driving?

“I have no idea who the fault lay with – but he is 97 years old and maybe his reactions are not as fast as they once were.”

While there is no legal limit on driving ages in the UK, motorists have to renew their licence at least 90 days before reaching the age of 70, and then every three years after that.

A picture from the scene of the crash shows a vehicle on its side. Pic: KLFM

Image: A picture from the scene of the crash shows a vehicle on its side. Pic: KLFM

Edmund King, the president of the AA, said calls for elderly drivers to face bans or restrictions after car crashes are misplaced.

He said: “We wish the Duke of Edinburgh well. Many commentators use high-profile car crashes involving elderly drivers as a reason to call for bans or restrictions on older drivers.

“If driving restrictions based on age and safety were introduced we would be more likely to restrict young drivers rather than older drivers.

“Young, predominantly male, drivers are much more likely to crash within six months of passing their test than older drivers within six months of hanging up their keys.

Prince Philip car crash

Image: Prince Philip was uninjured in the collision

“Older drivers often self restrict their driving by not driving at night and only driving on familiar roads.

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“The decision to hang up your keys is a tough one but should be based on personal advice from your GP and family rather than being based on some arbitrary age.

“We all age differently and the car is an essential lifeline for many elderly people.”

'Scenes of horror': Jury hear vivid descriptions of Hillsborough disaster

Jurors have heard the vivid descriptions of the “vice-like” crushing of Liverpool football fans in a “scene of horror” at the Hillsborough disaster in 1989. 

The police match commander David Duckenfield is on trial accused of gross negligence manslaughter over his role at the FA Cup semi-final between Liverpool and Nottingham Forest.

The jury were shown videos that illustrated second by second what was happening on the terraces.

They also heard the radio messages between officers on the ground and the police control box.

In one recording, an officer outside the Leppings Lane entrance before kick-off told his senior officers the overcrowding was “bloody chaos”.

The jury were told that, once some of the gates were opened, more fans got into the stadium and naturally headed down the central tunnel towards the terraces behind the goal.

The pens directly behind the goal, numbers three and four, were already dangerously full.

The prosecution said that one Liverpool fan, Colin Moneypenny, recalled: “He was on tiptoe. A body was underneath one of his feet. He could not move.

Image: The footage showed second by second what was happening on the terraces

“There was intense pressure around him. Because he was tall he could breathe normally. He could turn his head and scream and shout, which he did.

“He thought it was at least a good 15 minutes before things changed. His experience was one, in his words, of just shouting and screaming and trying to get people to help with absolutely no effect for virtually the whole of that period.”

The prosecutor said they would also hear from Stephen Allen, an off-duty police officer.

He said: “We will hear from him what, in short, I can describe now as the remarkable help he gave and the scene of horror around him.”

Police officers at Hillsborough warned there would be deaths if nothing was done to let a growing crowd of fans in before kick off, a court has heard. 3:19

Video: Police at Hillsborough warned there would be deaths if a crowd of fans were not let in before kick off, a court has heard.

The members of the jury were told that David Duckenfield did nothing to “prevent, to hinder, discourage the flow of people down the central tunnel; nor did he take any action to avert the inevitable result.”

Prosecutor Richard Matthews QC said: “No one in the control box said anything about closing the tunnel. They were not concentrating on the consequences of relieving the pressure outside. There was no discussion after the opening of Gate C.”

“It is the prosecution case that it was David Duckenfield, the match commander, his duty to consider the consequences of opening the gates.”

The ex-South Yorkshire Police chief superintendent David Duckenfield is accused of manslaughter by gross negligence of 95 people who died in the 1989 Hillsborough disaster.

Image: Pens directly behind the goal were dangerously full, the court heard

Duckenfield’s defence team then made a statement to the jury. Ben Myers QC said that the criminal prosecution of his client was unfair.

“He was not equipped with special powers to anticipate things that everyone else did not.”

“Our sympathy with those who suffered can never be a reason to convict someone for events beyond their control or responsibility.”

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Duckenfield denies the charge of gross negligence manslaughter. Graham Mackrell, the former Sheffield Wednesday club secretary, denies safety breaches.

The case continues.

Duke of Edinburgh involved in car crash while driving near Sandringham

The Duke of Edinburgh has been involved in a car crash while behind the wheel close to the Sandringham Estate.

Buckingham Palace says Prince Philip was not injured in the collision.

Pictures from the scene show the 97-year-old’s Range Rover overturned on the side of the road and the heavily damaged vehicle close to a recovery truck.

Image: The heavily damaged Range Rover is seen behind a recovery vehicle

Another passenger was in the vehicle at the time of the crash. While a spokeswoman would not comment on who this was, it was likely his close protection officer.

The Duke of Edinburgh leaving the Queen's Christmas lunch at Buckingham Palace

Image: Prince Philip has seen a doctor as a precautionary measure. File pic

A palace spokesperson said: “The Duke of Edinburgh was involved in a road traffic accident with another vehicle on Thursday afternoon.

“The Duke was not injured. The accident took place close to the Sandringham Estate. Local police attended the scene.”

Prince Philip driving the Obamas and the Queen into Windsor Castle on the president's state visit in 2016

Image: Prince Philip driving the Obamas and the Queen into Windsor Castle on the president’s state visit in 2016

Norfolk Police said officers were called to the estate shortly before 3pm “following reports of a collision involving two cars”.

Rhiannon Mills, Sky’s royal correspondent, said: “From what I understand, Prince Philip has been seen by a doctor since that accident took place.

“I’m told that was a precautionary measure and that he is doing fine and that we should not be unduly concerned.

Queen Elizabeth II talking to the Duke of Edinburgh during the Royal Windsor Horse Show at Windsor Castle in May 2018

Image: The Duke of Edinburgh talks to the Queen from his car in May 2018

“Obviously, the fact that he is 97 years old will bring with it its own concerns. He is of course very independent and he has been a very active man.

“He has been trying to stay as active as possible since he retired from public duties. We also know that he is spending time at the moment on the Sandringham Estate with his wife, the Queen.

“They spend time there during the Christmas period and right through until February – until the date which marks the death of the Queen’s father.

The Duke of Edinburgh leaving the King Edward VII's Hospital in London after recovering from a planned surgery in April 2018

Image: The Duke of Edinburgh underwent surgery in 2018 – months after retiring from public duties

“Prince Philip has been spending a great deal of time on the Sandringham Estate anyway since he retired from public duties.”

The Duke of Edinburgh took the step back from engagements in 2017, and underwent a hip replacement in May last year.

Sky’s royal commentator, Alastair Bruce, said the duke is getting over “what must have been an incredible shock”.

Despite his advancing years, Prince Philip, has always been “an incredibly active person and very keen on remaining physically active,” he said.

Royal author Penny Junor said she was “amazed that he got out unscathed,” and, “like anyone else his age, would have been shocked by what happened”.

John Sentamu, the Archbishop of York, tweeted his best wishes, urging God to “bless Philip Duke of Edinburgh”.

The incident is bound to raise questions about whether the 97-year-old duke is still able to drive safely.

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While there is no legal age at which you must stop driving, by law, you have to renew your licence at least 90 days before reaching the age of 70, and then every three years after that.

The duke drove former US president Barack Obama and his wife Michelle in a Range Rover during the Obama’s state visit in 2016.

Jury shown footage capturing moments before airshow crash

Footage capturing the moments before 11 people were killed in the Shoreham Airshow crash has been shown to a jury.

A stunt was being performed by pilot Andrew Hill in a 1950s Hawker Hunter before it plunged onto the A27 in West Sussex, exploding into a fireball at 1.22pm on 22 August 2015.

The 54-year-old is standing trial at the Old Bailey and denies 11 charges of manslaughter by gross negligence.

Jurors watched footage from the cockpit of the plane as relatives of the victims sat quietly in the packed public gallery.

The court heard that footage from the GoPro camera, positioned behind the pilot’s seat, showed Hill performing a flypast parallel to Shoreham Airport’s runway, inverting the aircraft and showing the land below, and then performing a stunt called a Derry roll.

In the footage, the A27 comes into view and the camera then shows the sky as Hill begins the fatal loop manoeuvre.

Hill, wearing a helmet, is seen moving during the flight and nothing can be heard apart from the sound of the engine.

The aircraft then begins to judder and flies low along the road before it crashes.

Image: Andrew Hill is facing 11 counts of gross negligence at the Old Bailey

Tom Kark QC, prosecuting, had previously told the court that the crash was “purely” because of “pilot error” after the aircraft was flown too low and too slow.

The court heard that although Hill was normally a careful and competent pilot, there had been some previous incidents where he had played “fast and loose” with the rules and appeared to have a “cavalier attitude” towards safety.

Mr Kark told jurors that Hill, of Sandon, Buntingford, Hertfordshire, had made a “catalogue of errors” – including:

:: The aircraft entered the loop manoeuvre too slow and did not have enough “energy” to reach the top

:: Hill failed to apply full thrust on the approach to the loop as he should have done

:: The aircraft did not reach sufficient height at the peak of the loop – called the apex

:: Hill made a “conscious decision” to add flap and begin a descent despite not reaching the height needed

:: The plane had insufficient speed at the apex

:: Hill “failed to execute an escape manoeuvre in the time available” but tried to pull through the loop – described by one expert as a “cardinal sin”.

The court heard that immediately after the crash, Hill told emergency services he did not remember or know what happened but felt “terrible” and had been feeling unwell.

Mr Kark told the court: “The aircraft crashed as a result of Mr Hill’s negligence and as such this breach of duty caused the deaths of 11 men.

“Having regard to the serious and obvious risk of death, the negligence of Mr Hill was truly exceptionally bad such as to amount to the criminal offence of gross negligence manslaughter.

“If a pilot continued to fly an aerobatic display above a crowd of spectators, knowing that he was unwell, then that, we would suggest, would be capable of amounting to a gross breach of his duty of care.”

Defending, Karim Khalil, told the court criticisms made of Hill – a former Royal Air Force instructor and British Airways commercial captain – were “either wrong or misplaced”.

He said Hill had no memory of the crash and “may have been suffering cognitive impairment”.

He added: “He was subjected to the increasing forces of gravity.”

Hill was left with serious, life-threatening injuries and his life was saved by being thrown from the plane before medics placed Hill in a medically induced coma.

He said it would be a “remarkable pilot indeed” who had never made an error.

Hill had responded to making any mistake in a “respectful” manner and was keen to ensure it did not happen again, said Mr Khalil.

Mr Hill was flying a vintage Hawker Hunter before he crashed

Image: Hill was flying a vintage Hawker Hunter before he crashed

Mr Khalil said: “Pilot error does not explain what happened here at all,” adding: “He is not a cavalier pilot and not a pilot who, as is suggested, plays fast and loose [with the rules]. Quite the contrary. He did not deliberately fail to take evasive action.”

The victims are Maurice Abrahams, 76; Dylan Archer, 42; Tony Brightwell, 53; Matthew Grimstone, 23; Matt Jones, 24; Graham Mallinson, 72; Daniele Polito, 23; Mark Reeves, 53; Jacob Schilt, 23; Richard Smith, 26; and Mark Trussler, 54, who all lived in Sussex.

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Originally Hill was charged with one count of recklessly or negligently endangering an aircraft under air navigation laws but this was dropped before the trial began, the CPS said.

The trial continues.

May tells Corbyn it is 'impossible' to rule out 'no-deal' Brexit

Theresa May has told Jeremy Corbyn it is “impossible” for her to rule out a “no-deal” Brexit, after the Labour leader sought to block his MPs from helping the government break a deadlock over Britain’s EU exit.

Mr Corbyn has instructed them not to “engage” with senior ministers until the prime minister takes the threat of leaving without an agreement off the table.

He asked them to “respect” his own position and “refrain” from contact designed to secure enough support from cross-party MPs to get an agreement passed through Parliament.

Mr Corbyn has dismissed the PM’s cross-party talks as a “stunt” and urged her to “ditch the red lines and get serious about proposals for the future”.

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Video: PM’s offer of talks ‘is a stunt’

Seeking to keep up the pressure on the Labour leader, the PM wrote to him reiterating that she was “disappointed” at his refusal to meet.

She said her door remains open for talks, but told Mr Corbyn on his “no-deal” demand: “That is an impossible condition because it is not within the government’s power to rule out no deal.”

She said this could be done only by getting a deal through Parliament or by overturning the 2016 referendum result, something she was not prepared to do.

Labour MPs had spent Thursday meeting senior government figures.

Labour MPs Hilary Benn and Yvette Cooper in Whitehall, London outside the Cabinet Office, after the Prime Minister announced that she would invite party leaders in the Commons and other MPs in for discussion to get a Parliamentary consensus on the way forward over Brexit. 3:01

Video: Opposition parties set out clear condition for Brexit support to PM

Senior committee chairs Yvette Cooper and Hilary Benn emerged from top-level talks in the Cabinet Office to say they were unaware of Mr Corbyn’s instruction.

But Mr Benn told journalists they were “doing our job as parliamentarians”.

Asked if Mr Corbyn should have been there too, the Brexit select committee chair said: “That’s a decision for Jeremy to take.

“He’s demonstrating it’s not just the prime minister who can be stubborn.”

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Mr Benn added the Labour leader was “quite right” to demand no-deal be ruled out.

Chuka Umunna, a backbench Labour MP, vowed to carry on engaging with the government because Brexit is “above party politics”.

Another told Sky News: “There are many people I look to for guidance as to who and who not to speak to. Jeremy Corbyn isn’t one of them.”

Mrs May wrote to the Labour leader herself to “sincerely” urge him to help her “reach a solution” with “little time left”.

Theresa May 2:50

Video: ‘Door open’ to Labour, May says

She said: “You have always believed in the importance of dialogue in politics.

“Do you really believe that, as well as declining to meet for talks yourself, it is right to ask your MPs not to seek a solution with the government.”

Meanwhile, a row has broken out after the government suggested it would take more than a year to hold a second referendum.

 1:38

Video: May says ‘government will listen’ after deal defeat

MPs attending the Brexit talks were shown the civil service assessment, but campaigners for another vote have disputed the timetable.

Former attorney general Dominic Grieve, a supporter of the People’s Vote campaign, said the claim was “simply wrong” and “it is neither helpful nor right to have misleading information of this kind put out”.

The failure of Mr Corbyn’s no-confidence motion in the government on Wednesday has renewed pressure on the Labour leader to back a second referendum.

The co-chair of Leave Means Leave tells Sky News talk of a second referendum should be stopped. 5:04

Video: ‘Leave means Leave’ co-chair: Full steam ahead with ‘managed no-deal’

Speaking in Hastings earlier on Thursday, Mr Corbyn admitted that if the UK was facing the “potential disaster” of a no-deal divorce then Labour would look at supporting another referendum.

However, the Labour leader stressed his party would still prioritise trying to secure a general election or achieve a Brexit deal on the terms they have demanded.

He added that Labour would “come back again” with more no-confidence votes to topple the government.

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Mrs May will reveal her Brexit Plan B on Monday, after MPs emphatically rejected her deal by 230 votes on Tuesday.

She will then face a debate on it on Tuesday 29 January, with parliamentarians getting a second chance to amend and vote on it.

Corbyn blocks MPs from helping May break Brexit deadlock

Jeremy Corbyn has sought to block Labour MPs from helping the government break a deadlock over Brexit, as the clock ticks down to 29 March.

The Labour leader instructed them not to “engage” with senior ministers until Theresa May takes the threat of “no-deal” off the table.

He asked them to “respect” his own position and “refrain” from contact designed to secure enough support from cross-party MPs to get an agreement passed in parliament.

The prime minister sought to pile pressure on him by writing a letter saying she was “disappointed” at his refusal to meet.

Image: Theresa May urged the Labour leader ‘sincerely’ to meet her

Labour MPs had spent Thursday meeting senior government figures.

Senior committee chairs Yvette Cooper and Hilary Benn emerged from top-level talks in the Cabinet Office to say they were unaware of Mr Corbyn’s instruction.

But Mr Benn told journalists they were “doing our job as parliamentarians”.

Asked if Mr Corbyn should have been there too, the Brexit select committee chair said: “That’s a decision for Jeremy to take.

“He’s demonstrating it’s not just the prime minister who can be stubborn.”

Mr Benn added the Labour leader was “quite right” to demand no-deal be ruled out.

Labour MPs Hilary Benn and Yvette Cooper in Whitehall, London outside the Cabinet Office, after the Prime Minister announced that she would invite party leaders in the Commons and other MPs in for discussion to get a Parliamentary consensus on the way forward over Brexit.

Image: Labour MPs Hilary Benn and Yvette Cooper met government ministers

Chuka Umunna, a backbench Labour MP, vowed to carry on engaging with the government because Brexit is “above party politics”.

Another told Sky News: “There are many people I look to for guidance as to who and who not to speak to. Jeremy Corbyn isn’t one of them.”

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Mrs May wrote to the Labour leader herself to “sincerely” urge him to help her “reach a solution” with “little time left”.

She said: “You have always believed in the importance of dialogue in politics.

“Do you really believe that, as well as declining to meet for talks yourself, it is right to ask your MPs not to seek a solution with the government.”

 1:38

Video: ‘The government will listen’

It comes after Mr Corbyn gave a speech in Hastings, where he admitted that if the UK was facing the “potential disaster” of a no-deal divorce then Labour would look at supporting another referendum.

However, the Labour leader stressed his party would still prioritise trying to secure a general election or achieve a Brexit deal on the terms they have demanded.

He added that Labour would “come back again” with more “no-confidence” votes to topple the government, after losing the first bid on Wednesday.

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Mrs May will reveal her Brexit plan B next Monday, after MPs emphatically rejected it by 230 votes.

She will then face a debate on it on Tuesday 29 January, with parliamentarians getting a second chance to amend and vote on it.

Bercow wins international fans amid Brexit drama

The world has been gripped by events in British politics in recent days, as Theresa May battles to save her premiership and get Brexit back on track.

And House of Commons Speaker John Bercow has been making headlines for his marshalling of proceedings in the chamber.

Although the 55-year-old is a divisive figure in Westminster, having promised to stand down in the summer amid bullying allegations, foreign news organisations and social media users have been lapping up his antics.

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation published a video on Twitter on Wednesday with the title “British Parliament’s House Speaker is not to be trifled with”, featuring clips of some of his pronouncements.

One CBC news editor wrote in response: “Sitting in the newsroom today and hearing that voice, I thought someone in the control room decided they’d rather watch a Pirates Of The Caribbean movie than news.”

A video of the speaker published by Tagesschau, a German news programme, has received more than 500,000 views on Twitter.

Mr Bercow’s ties have also drawn attention, particularly his rainbow neckwear on display on Tuesday, the day MPs voted to reject Mrs May’s deal.

“Bercow has the air of a man who’s been dragged out of the kitchen by his wife to break up an argument between their rowdy teenagers, but he’s been home from work for a few hours and has already knocked back half a bottle of Chardonnay,” said one Twitter user.

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The variety of facial expressions the speaker displays whilst cajoling MPs has also been compared to the “four stages of a night out”.

On Reddit, plenty of users have been cracking jokes.

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“John, what’s your favourite 80s band? New ORDERRRRR!” wrote one.

“Of course New ORDERRRRR was formed by members of Joy DIVISIOOOOON,” replied another Redditor, referencing Mr Bercow’s cry on Tuesday, which was so loud it overloaded the Commons microphones.